Aftermath of Hurricane Florence brings out ‘best of the human…

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Featured Events Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Volunteers from St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Columbia, South Carolina, join with Army National Guard members from Charlotte on Sept. 24 in cleaning up a playground area on the grounds of Christ Episcopal Church in New Bern, a North Carolina city that was hit hard by Hurricane Florence. Photo: Christ Episcopal Church, via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] What does hurricane recovery look like to the Rev. Ron Abrams? Hurricane Florence, which devastated parts of the Carolinas two weeks ago, downed a tree but did little other damage to the church grounds and facilities of St. James Parish in Wilmington, North Carolina, where he is rector.Abrams downplayed the damage at St. James. For him, the image of hurricane recovery is one of goodwill and an eagerness to help others, some of whom have lost nearly everything.“People are really caring about each other. I’ve seen the best of the human spirit,” Abrams told Episcopal News Service. “You just hope the goodwill continues, but it’s going to take a while. There’s some real significant damage.”Episcopal congregations and dioceses in the path of the storm, with support from Episcopal Relief & Development, have rallied behind their communities in a range of ways, from the “de-mucking” crew of parishioners assembled by St. James to the supplies drive organized by Christ Episcopal Church in New Bern, North Carolina, another city hit hard by the storm.Since Florence made landfall Sept. 15 near Wilmington, congregation members have taken the lead in serving as the Episcopal Church’s outreach ministers to their communities. The Diocese of East Carolina, which includes the coastal third of North Carolina, has remained in regular contact with local clergy, and Bishop Rob Skirving will travel to Wilmington on Sept. 28 for a three-day visit with clergy, parishioners and residents.One of Skirving’s goals is “just being present with them, trying to be supportive,” he said in an interview with ENS.Within the first two days of the storm’s arrival, he and two of his canons teamed up to contact more than 100 diocesan clergy members by phone to make sure they were all right and to check on their congregations’ initial needs. A week ago, on Sept. 20, Skirving visited New Bern to meet with Christ Episcopal Church clergy and some of the residents who were cleaning up their houses after floodwaters receded.One of his first stops Sept. 28 will be a meeting with clergy of the deanery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Wilmington – a chance to bring people together to talk about their experiences in this time of struggle.“While it’s not as critical as some of the hands-on relief work, it’s still an important part,” Skirving said.Churches along the North Carolina coast are helping with the hands-on work as well. St. James, the city’s oldest church, is in the center of Wilmington and was able to open its doors quickly after the storm to house relief workers needing a place to stay. Search and rescue operations are mostly concluded, and the focus has turned to clearing and gutting formerly flooded houses so they can be fixed.“The issue with the flooding in houses is if you don’t get everything stripped to the studs before the mold sets in, the houses aren’t usable,” Abrams said.He estimates his congregation has room to provide housing for up to 50 relief workers in the parish house and other spaces at the church. Work groups with established relief organizations have brought volunteers from all over the country to St. James, including one man from Australia. Parishioners have responded by donating supplies to help welcome the workers.Across town, Church of the Servant Episcopal Church also made it through the storm without much damage, and since then the Rev. Jody Greenwood, rector, has been checking in on her parishioners as they assess the status of their properties.Some lost trees and fences, Greenwood said. Others are dealing with damaged cars and flooded homes. Greenwood, too, is staying at a friend’s house while her own roof is repaired after being damaged during Florence. But even the lucky ones who escaped great personal loss can feel the trauma of an upended landscape that no longer looks familiar.“I think the emotional wear and tear of seeing things that felt so secure become less secure needs to be taken seriously,” Greenwood said.She also has attended meetings of an ecumenical group that is helping to coordinate long-term relief efforts. The group secured a warehouse for six months to hold supplies; use of that facility could be extended another six months, she said.“It’s going to be a long process,” Greenwood said.After canceling Sunday services in the immediate aftermath of the storm, the congregation combined its normal three services to one on Sept. 23. More than 100 parishioners attended, though many were still out of town after fleeing the storm.Greenwood expects attendance will swell on Sept. 30. “I think people just really want to see each other,” she said, and Skirving is scheduled to preach at the service.In New Bern, the Rev. Paul Canady, rector of Christ Episcopal Church, said Florence left about 15 families and individual members of the congregation homeless, either because their houses are in need of significant repairs or are beyond repair.“That’s a strain on them. That’s a strain on all of us,” he said. “And I feel like what we’re doing well is we’re trying to love each other through all of this and try to be patient with each other.”He noted that even parishioners whose homes sustained major damage are out in the community offering to help their neighbors. Outside groups also have arrived to assist New Bern in bouncing back.Although Christ Episcopal Church mostly was spared by Florence, the storm left a trail of tree branches and debris in the church playground. A group from St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Columbia, South Carolina, which is staying at Canady’s church this week while they help with relief efforts, spent time in the playground Sept. 24 leading a cleanup.Life in New Bern may not return to normal for a while. The schools have canceled classes the past two weeks, and Canady, whose children are in first and fourth grades, wasn’t sure as of early Sept. 27 whether classes would resume next week. Some school facilities are still serving as shelters, and other schools were damaged in the storm or need to be tested for mold.Worship services at Christ Episcopal Church resumed Sept. 23, after the power was restored and the air conditioning was up and running again. Canady, though, said his focus has been on getting into the community and checking in with parishioners.Abrams said he grew up on Long Island, New York, and experienced his share of hurricanes, but they didn’t prepare him for Florence.“This one was pretty bad,” he said. “I’ve had parishioners in their 90s tell me this was the worst hurricane they’ve ever seen.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Hurricane Florence Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Sep 27, 2018 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Aftermath of Hurricane Florence brings out ‘best of the human spirit’ in coastal North Carolina Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Regional funding seminar in Birmingham

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis David Rayner,­ Policy Advisor and VCS Liaison Officer, Neighbourhood RenewalUnit, Office of the Deputy prime Minister, speaking on “The translation andimplementation of ODPM policy at a regional level and how this informs funding priorities”Tamara Flanagan,­ CSV Director of European and Statutory Funding, speaking on “What hasbeing European done for us and the preservation of European funding post2007″Professor Charles Craddock , Cure Leukaemia, and David Taylor,­ Head ofRegeneration, University Hospital Birmingham speaking together on “Funded by the RegionalDevelopment Agency: a capital case study”Registration and tea/coffee is from 11.30 and the first speaker starts at midday. The event includes a lunch and a ‘what works’ discussion forum.It will be held at Birmingham Voluntary Service Council, a five minute walk from Birmingham New Street station. The fee is is £25 per person including buffet lunch and refreshments.To ensure questions from delegates are covered, the organisers are inviting questions for the speakers to be submitted beforehand.Contact Philippa Day at Day to Day Consulting.  15 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 31 March 2005 | News Regional funding seminar in Birmingham Advertisement The Midlands regional group and statutory special interest groups of the Institute of Fundraising are holding a joint seminar on ‘routes to regional funding’ in Birmingham on 21 April 2005.Speakers at the event will include: read more

Why do wealthy donors give to charity? New book ‘Richer Lives’ explains

first_img  160 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 4 October 2013 | News Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Major gift Research / statistics To find out what motivates rich people to give to charity, University of Kent academic Dr Beth Breeze and leading philanthropy adviser Theresa Lloyd interviewed 82 wealthy UK donors. The results of their research have been published in a new book, ‘Richer Lives: why rich people give”.The book follows on from a study about wealthy donors published 10 years ago. Indeed, 40 of the donors interviewed took part in the original research.The authors reveal that philanthropy has changed in the past 10 years. Now almost all those who give substantial amounts of money also give substantial amounts of their time. This can of course prove a challenge to charities with limited skills and resources in channelling this effectively. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img  159 total views,  1 views today Why do wealthy donors give to charity? New book ‘Richer Lives’ explains Major donors acknowledge that fundraisers have become more professional over the past decade and are much better at researching potential donors and understanding how different donors may want to engage with a charity.The economic crisis has changed major donors’ views of their wealth. Despite being objectively wealthy, many do not feel financially secure, an attitude which serve as a barrier to giving more.The authors make clear that, while wealthy donors give for a number of different reasons, “almost every rich donor we interviewed expressed the view that giving enriches their life.” A similar message was reported in John Nickson’s Giving Is Good For You, published this year. The personal benefits of giving create a virtuous circle leading to deeper and longer-lasting commitments to good causes, which in turn heightens the enjoyment and satisfaction of using money for good.In contrast, it includes a chapter considering why many of the wealthiest in the UK do not give much or anything to charity.Wealthy donors’ attitudes to givingThe book includes a number of recommendations for increasing the number of wealthy people who give to charity and the amount given. For example, donors are encouraged to ask their wealthy friends and contacts to give at comparable levels, not least because potentia givers prefer to be asked by someone they know and trust.It also highlights a number of attitudes that fundraisers at least should be aware of. For example:wealthy donors say that a ‘serious’ gift has to be at least £10,000, and gifts of this size and larger should yield access to the charity’s leaders.philanthropists are keen to be strategic in their giving, tackling underlying causes rather than symptoms, and exploring now opportunities for giving such as social investmentmany donors perceive people working in charities as well-intentioned but inefficient. Rich donors need reassurance and proof that charities can and will make best use of their donations.philanthropists have not forgotten the insulting suggestion that they were ‘tax dodgers’ contained in government proposals in the 2012 Budget to cap charity tax reliefInterview with Theresa Lloyd Richer Lives: why rich people give is published by the Directory of Social Change in paperback and costs £15. Advertisementlast_img read more

IoF offers bursaries to attend legacy fundraising conference

first_img Howard Lake | 14 January 2014 | News IoF offers bursaries to attend legacy fundraising conference Photo: My Will – Alex Skopje on Shutterstock.com AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The Institute of Fundraising is offering bursaries to members at small charities to enable them to attend its Legacy Fundraising conference in March.The bursaries, funded by the Office for Civil Society, are open to members who work for an organisation with a voluntary income of less than £1 million. Recipients of the bursaries will have to pay just £20 to attend the Legacy Fundraising conference which takes place on 27 March 2014 in Manchester.Payment for bursary places is taken at the application stage. For unsuccessful applicants, this payment will of course be refunded.The deadline for Legacy Fundraising bursary applications is 14 February 2014.center_img  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Institute of Fundraising legacies Training About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Renowned Cardiologist and Vein Specialist, Dr. Armin Foghi, Joins La Jolla Vein Care

first_imgLocal NewsBusiness WhatsApp Facebook Dr. Foghi Brings Unique Total Circulatory System Expertise to La Jolla Vein Care’s Burgeoning Practice WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Pinterestcenter_img Previous articleGap Inc. Announces Plans to Build New Distribution Center in Longview, Texas to Meet Rising Demand for Digital ShoppingNext articleThe Latest: Fauci: NIH to study ‘long-haul’ virus symptoms Digital AIM Web Support Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Twitter Renowned Cardiologist and Vein Specialist, Dr. Armin Foghi, Joins La Jolla Vein Care TAGS  last_img read more

Potential for Southern Hemisphere climate surprises

first_imgClimate model results suggest that future climate change in Antarctica will be accompanied by continued strengthening and poleward contraction of the Southern Ocean westerly wind belt. Paleoclimate records suggest past changes in the westerly winds can be abrupt and that healing of the Antarctic ozone hole could lead to poleward contraction of the westerlies and increased meridional atmospheric transport of warm air regionally into Antarctica. An abrupt shift to more meridional circulation could lead to notable changes in moisture availability for extra-Antarctic regions, increased Antarctic ice sheet disintegration and more rapid sea-level rise.last_img

Arctic LNG 2 chartered 15 Arc7 tankers to be built at Zvezda Shipyard

first_img Arctic LNG 2 chartered 15 Arc7 tankers. (Credit: wasi1370 from Pixabay) PAO NOVATEK announced that its joint venture Arctic LNG 2 (“Arctic LNG 2” and/or the “Project”) entered into long-term charter agreements on 14 Arc7 ice-class LNG tankers with SMART LNG (a joint venture between NOVATEK and PAO Sovcomflot), with the construction of the LNG tankers to be built at the Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex. The signing of the charter agreements allowed SMART LNG to conclude the corresponding contracts with the VEB.RF Group and Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex LLC for the construction and lease financing of these vessels.In October 2019, the contracts for chartering, financing and construction of a pilot ice-class LNG tanker to be built at the Zvezda shipyard were signed.  Earlier, the participants of Arctic LNG 2 (NOVATEK, TOTAL, CNPC, CNOOC, and the consortium of Mitsui and JOGMEC) in accordance with the Projects’ Sea Transportation Strategy, approved the construction of 15 Arc7 ice-class LNG tankers at Zvezda Shipbuilding Complex.The construction of 15 state-of-the-art ice-class gas tankers ensures the core formation of the Arctic fleet for the Project that will allow the year round transport of LNG along the Northern Sea Route to the Asian Pacific region, and provide an important stimulus to develop the Russian shipbuilding industry.NoteArctic LNG 2 envisages constructing three LNG liquefaction trains of 6.6 million tons per annum each, as well as cumulative gas condensate production capacity of 1.6 million tons per annum. The total LNG capacity of the three liquefaction trains will be 19.8 million tons. The Project utilizes an innovative construction concept using gravity-based structure (GBS) platforms to reduce overall capital cost and minimize the Project’s environmental footprint in the Arctic zone of Russia.The Project’s participants include: NOVATEK (60%), TOTAL (10%), CNPC (10%), CNOOC (10%) and the consortium of Mitsui and JOGMEC (10%). Source: Company Press Release The construction of 15 state-of-the-art ice-class gas tankers ensures the core formation of the Arctic fleet for the Project that will allow the year round transport of LNG along the Northern Sea Route to the Asian Pacific regionlast_img read more

PETRONAS’ upstream operations in Myanmar declares force majeure on Yetagun Field

first_img PETRONAS’ upstream operations in Myanmar declares force majeure on Yetagun Field. (Credit: C Morrison from Pixabay) PC Myanmar (Hong Kong) Limited (PCML), a subsidiary of PETRONAS, has declared Force Majeure (FM) on its Yetagun field on 1 April 2021 due to depletion of gas production at the field, located in the Andaman Sea, offshore Myanmar, in Blocks M12, M13 and M14.The decision was made following challenges in the wells deliverability that resulted in the production rate dropping below the technical threshold of the offshore gas processing plant. PCML has temporarily ceased production at the Yetagun field until further notice.PCML Country Head, Liau Min Hoe said: “Prior to the cessation of production, Yetagun field was producing well below the technical turndown rate of its facilities. There  has been a drastic decline in production level due to subsurface challenges in the field  since  January 2021 and it has further deteriorated recently.“Continuing to produce at a low rate would  impose significant risks to the integrity of our assets and the safety of our people. As a responsible operator, we had to temporarily cease production and declare force majeure. We have put in place an intervention plan to mitigate the matter, and  have informed the host authority, our partners and gas buyer of our decision,” he added.PCML has been the operator of the Yetagun Gas Project since 2003, where it holds 40.9% participating interest together with its affiliate, while Myanma Oil and Gas Enterprise holds 20.5%, Nippon Oil Exploration (Myanmar), Limited holds 19.3% and PTTEP International Limited holds the remaining 19.3%.PCML remains committed to its project in Yetagun and is taking all necessary measures to resume production as soon as possible. Source: Company Press Release PCML has temporarily ceased production at the Yetagun field until further noticelast_img read more

US Navy rolls out new IFRV coveralls

first_img The US Navy announced February 5 that the newest version of flame-resistant coveralls was now available to commands after passing a series of afloat wear tests.Improved Flame Resistant Variant (IFRV) coveralls are being introduced as a fleet organizational clothing item to replace the legacy Flame Resistant Variant (FRV). The IFRV addresses comfort and durability issues found with the original FRV coverall.“The original FRV was rapidly introduced to the fleet because sailor safety is our top priority,” said CAPT Mark Runstrom, director, Fleet Supply Operations/Services, USFF. “However, we recognized immediately that we needed a coverall that is more durable, functional, and comfortable as well as safe. That is what the IFRV is all about.”Sailors stationed aboard ships and submarines will be issued a minimum of two IFRV coveralls with units authorized to procure name tags using unit operating target funds. The manner of wear will be the same as the FRV coveralls, prescribing wearers to don full sleeves and secured fastenings. The current 9-inch black, steel-toed boot and Navy or command ball caps are authorized for wear with the coverall.Approved belts include a black cotton web belt for E1-E6, a khaki cotton web belt for chief petty officers and officers and; rigger’s belts are authorized at command discretion.Rank tabs and insignia are authorized to be sewn or pinned on the coverall based on the wearer’s duties and unit preference.Rectangular, Velcro-backed name tags will be worn centered, 1/4-inch above the left breast pocket-similar in size, shape and content to the V-neck sweater name tag. Embossed leather name tags or fabric embroidered unit specific name tags similar to those worn on the green Nomex flight jacket will be authorized for wear at the discretion of unit commanders.Blue or brown undershirts are authorized for wear with the IFRV, although blue undershirts are being phased out with the introduction of the Navy Working Uniform Type III.The IFRV coverall is made from a flame resistant, tri-fiber blend designed to offer arc flash protection and provide improved moisture management by allowing the fiber to breathe more efficiently. The IFRV coverall is also designed for sustained durability lasting nearly twice as long as the FRV.Additionally, feedback during fleet testing of the IFRV revealed a desire for a two-piece FRV. USFF has developed several versions with varying design features that will be tested in the spring of 2018. US Navy rolls out new IFRV coveralls View post tag: US Navy View post tag: IFRV February 6, 2018center_img Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today US Navy rolls out new IFRV coveralls Share this articlelast_img read more

THE TRAIN OF LIFE

first_img At birth we boarded the train and met our parents, and we believe they will always travel on our side.However, at some station our parents will step down from the train, leaving us on this journey alone.As time goes by, other people will board the train; and they will be significant i.e. our siblings, friends, children, and even the love of your life.Many will step down and leave a permanent vacuum.  Others will go so unnoticed that we don’t realize they vacated their seats.This train ride will be full of joy, sorrow, fantasy, expectations, hellos, goodbyes, and farewells.Success consists of having a good relationship with all passengers requiring that we give the best of ourselves.The mystery to everyone is: We do not know at which station we ourselves will step down. So, we must live in the best way, love, forgive, and offer the best of who we are.It is important to do this because when the time comes for us to step down and leave our seat empty we should leave behind beautiful memories for those who will continue to travel on the train of life.I wish you a joyful journey on the train of life  Reap success and give lots of love.More importantly, thank God for the journey.  Lastly, I thank you for being one of the passengers on my train.By the way, I am not planning to get off the train anytime soon but if I do, just remember I am glad you were part of my journey.EDITORS FOOTNOTE: This was sent to us by an unidentified source and we thought is was worth sharing.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more