University of Limerick and Revenue continue ‘unique partnership’ with contract signing

first_imgBilly Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Linkedin 20.01.20. REPRO FREEUniversity of Limerick and Revenue have signed a contract for a new Diploma in Applied Tax Administration, continuing a ‘unique partnership’ between the institutions.It comes as close to 200 Revenue students graduated at UL this Monday from the Diploma in Applied Taxation, BA (Hons) in Applied Taxation and MBA programmes.UL President Dr Des Fitzgerald (left) and Revenue Chairman Niall Cody (right) signed the Service Level Agreement to accredit the new diploma for five years – with an option to extend for a further two years – at a ceremony in Plassey House this Monday. Picture by Alan Place.University of Limerick and Revenue have signed a contract for a new Diploma in Applied Tax Administration, continuing a ‘unique partnership’ between the institutions.It comes as close to 200 Revenue students graduate at UL this Monday from the Diploma in Applied Taxation, BA (Hons) in Applied Taxation and MBA programmes.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up UL President Dr Des Fitzgerald and Revenue Chairman Niall Cody signed the Service Level Agreement to accredit the new diploma for five years – with an option to extend for a further two years – at a ceremony in Plassey House this Monday.UL President Dr Des Fitzgerald (right) and Revenue Chairman Niall Cody (left) signed the Service Level Agreement to accredit the new diploma for five years – with an option to extend for a further two years – at a ceremony in Plassey House this Monday. Picture by Alan Place.In addition, UL and Revenue signed a separate contract for the delivery of Commercial Law and Company Law modules, delivered as part of the diploma programme.The partnership between UL and Revenue, the first of its kind for the Irish Civil Service, has been in existence since 2004, delivering a number of programmes at both diploma and degree level.To date, close to 1,500 Revenue employees have graduated from UL.Speaking at the signing, UL President Dr Des Fitzgerald, said: “This is a renewal of a unique partnership between our organisations that has already yielded a large amount of graduates who are part of UL’s journey in transforming education and Revenue’s journey in delivering some of the most efficient taxation services in Europe.“The renewal of this partnership stems from UL’s commitment to professional and executive education across a range of areas. Our partnership with Revenue has flourished since 2004 when we first established the accreditation of the Diploma in Applied Taxation. Now we will see a new programme and this partnership is an exemplar of a transformation in content and in the delivery of bespoke professional programmes.“Programmes that are developed with professional partners and are designed to meet the needs and requirements of today’s workforce and tomorrow’s leaders,” he added. WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Email Twitter Print Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Previous articlePaul O’Connell & John Horan Launch Team Limerick Clean-Up 6Next articleMcNamara notches winner number four of the year Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Advertisement Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick PostULUniversity of Limerick Facebook BusinessNewsUniversity of Limerick and Revenue continue ‘unique partnership’ with contract signingBy Staff Reporter – January 20, 2020 740 Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League openerlast_img read more

Watch Olivia Colman & More in the Docu-Musical London Road

first_img In London Road, sometimes people speak, sometimes they sing, and sometimes the difference between the two is barely distinguishable. Take a look below at an exclusive clip, adapted from Alecky Blythe and Adam Cork’s docu-musical. The film stars Emmy nominee Olivia Colman and tells the true story of a group of Ipswich neighbors after their street becomes the epicenter of a string of murders of young women. Every word you hear is taken directly from interviews of residents of Ipswich, down to every stutter and “uh.” The show premiered at the National Theatre in 2011 under the direction of Rufus Norris with a cast including Kate Fleetwood, Rosalie Craig and Clare Burt (all appear in the screen version, as does Tom Hardy).London Road is now playing in New York and will premiere in additional cities in America over the next two weeks. For complete information, click here. Olivia Colman in ‘London Road’ View Commentslast_img read more

Owego’s Evee Coleman commits to Binghamton University

first_imgAs an Owego Indian, Coleman has been named All-State twice, is a two-time STAC Metro all-star, and was named All-Tioga County defensive player in 2019 and 2020. This past season, Coleman averaged 20.2 points and 12 rebounds per game. Coleman announced her commitment on Twitter Sunday night. OWEGO (WBNG) — Owego Free Academy junior Evee Coleman will continue her basketball career at Binghamton University. “They have a great family program and everyone’s so close. I know players on the team already, I’ve been to their games, everything about the way they play and the whole program is amazing.” Coleman said she was recruited by Binghamton her freshman year, and the Bearcats program aligned with everything she was looking for in a college basketball program. “She always kept me in the program and talked to me a lot, I’ve been with her since 9th grade so that’s been awesome, it really helped make my decision.”center_img Coleman said she explored other options, but recently decided staying local was the path she wanted to take. Committed pic.twitter.com/mPDegjoKu4— Genevieve Coleman (@evee_coleman) May 17, 2020 Coleman said she paid close attention to the Bearcats during their successful 2019-2020 season, and coach Bethann Shapiro Ord played a huge factor in her decision. “It means the world to me that I can play so close to home and have my family there. I’m just super excited to play and have my career here.” “Like” Nicole Menner on Facebook and “Follow” her on Twitter.last_img read more

IRELAND BEAT ENGLAND AT CRICKET! AND WHY DONEGAL MAN SAYS CRICKET IS IRISH NATIONAL SPORT

first_imgTHE whole nation is celebrating after Ireland beat England in the World Cup….at CRICKET!But don’t be fooled…for cricket is in fact a native Irish sport! John Devlin is the Head Librarian at Letterkenny IT. Here, in this personal piece for Foinse last year, he argued that the GAA should embrace cricket as a national sport….. “Recently a local newspaper  printed an article about some local would-be cricket players who were unable to find a ground to play a game.The answer is simple, given that cricket is a traditional Gaelic sport – a local GAA ground. The GAA was set up to encourage and develop native Irish games and if we exclude athletics which would be universal the native Irish games are hurling, handball, cricket and croquet.I will leave aside hurling and handball as their Irishness has been well documented elsewhere and concentrate on those two other two great games of the Gaels…cricket and croquet.I will refer you to page 54 of Eoghan Corry’s ”The GAA Book of Lists” (Hodder Headline Ireland, 2005] and the chapter headed :”Cricket: the other Gaelic game.” In this Corry points out that in 1882 Michael Cusack wrote ”that the game best suited to the Irish character was cricket.”In his ”Our Boys ” column in ”The Shamrock” he declared ” that cricket was an Irish game suitable for young men to play”…….and advised readers of the rules of the game how to form a club and the requite equipment required. He also suggested that the young play childrens’ games (ludo as Gaeilge] , balloons (self explanatory], and boulders ( possibly road bowls which would now be lethal…….one would not send a child out on a bike now never mind hurling a boulder down the dual carriageway].Indeed, the term ”All Ireland” is a derivation of the term ”All England” as used by organisations as diverse as tennis ,cricket and lacrosse for their tournaments and the GAA based their All Ireland Championships on the English County cricket championship dating back to 1864.This model was easily adopted as cricket was widely played in Ireland (see Bobby Rackard’s autobiography…..the great Wexford hurler started as a cricketer in the cricket hot bed of Wexford] and cricket was a game of the Irish people in the 1880s until the GAA changed its mind about cherishing the native games and invented the game of Gaelic (sic.] football , in reality a cross between two English public school games, Association football and rugby ; and about as relevant to Irish traditional games as the Corrs are to Irish traditional music.This cricket, as a game of the common people, continued in rural areas like Lecale into the 1970s with all classes and creeds competing for the Trades League Cup in the Downpatrick region with teams being organised on work places as in the Inter Firms road race in Letterkenny or on townlands like Ardmeen.Indeed, the English even acknowledge cricket as an Irish game . Corry quotes Andrew Laing in his 1912 ”Imperial Cricket” that the earliest references to cricket are in the 11th century Irish Annals. Cuchlainn is described as ”defending the hole” in a game variously described as ”lub , luban or lubog” which seems to be a primitive form of cricket without stumps, bails or Henry Blofeld.However, Laing rather patronisingly ruins his acknowledgement to Irish tradition by condescendingly writing that although the game was invented in Ireland ”it was the genius of England which filled the hole, added the stumps, and carried the implements to perfection.” He might have added a century later that England would also steal our best players and not play them.Thus the case is made that the players of this most Gaelic of games should not be begging for somewhere to play but should be welcomed by the GAA , those self appointed guardians of traditional Irish sport , to play on GAA grounds instead of hosting a faux Irish game like Gaelic (sic.] football which is an invention of the calibre of the Ulster Scots language and invented for the same reason:” We’re different from usuns and we have our own game /language to prove it.”As for croquet the Derry socialist, Civil Rights campaigner , environmentalist, cricket enthusiast and thorn in the side of pomposity and humbug ,Eamonn McCann , wrote in an ”Hot Press” article that croquet is Irish and that as Gaelic football is ”just real football ruined to give it a faux Irish twist” that Croke Park should be renamed ”Croquet Park”.He writes:” Croquet emerged with written rules more than 200 years ago…a lifetime before gaelic football was invented by priests, alcoholics and Hibernians” and quotes Martin and Williams in their definitive (I will take Eamonn’s word on this] history of the game that British regiments and the aristocracy took this great old Irish game to England .McCann quotes the ‘revered’ croquet historian Dr. Prior , writing in 1872 ,”that one thing is certain :it is from Ireland that that croquet came to England.” It was the Irish who founded the Wimbledon Croquet and Tennis Club but croquet was soon discarded as the genteel Irish game was elbowed aside by a brash English riff-raff who preferred to see women flaunt their ankles and promoted tennis.Therefore, the Irish gave England Christianity (see Dan Snow and Cormac Bourke on the BBC’s current series on Celtic Christianity ], cricket and croquet and they gave us …..All Ireland Final Day and the Premier League on SKY.I think that the point has been made that instead of opening up Croke Park to Association Football and rugby, Croquet Park should be retained for the real traditional Irish sports of hurling,handball, cricket and croquet.Hurling has been let down by the GAA as it thrives competitively at senior level little beyond Munster and Kilkenny; handball has been sidelined and cricket and croquet not only ignored but disparaged…and for what ?……a game with a tradition as deep as the last Westlife  single. It is therefore plain that an indigenous game like cricket should be played on a GAA pitch.”What do you think? Cricket for O’Donnell Park? Email us at [email protected] BEAT ENGLAND AT CRICKET! AND WHY DONEGAL MAN SAYS CRICKET IS IRISH NATIONAL SPORT was last modified: March 3rd, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more